Community Science Opportunity – South Marin Christmas Bird Count

Please join Marin Audubon as a team volunteer or count area leader for the annual Christmas Bird Count, the nation’s longest running community science bird project. Audubon’s CBCs started on the East Coast in 1901 and Marin Audubon’s South Marin CBC started in 1978. The counts are conducted every year from mid-December to early January in approximately 2,100 count circles across the USA as well as in other countries. Data from the counts are analyzed by National Audubon and is critical for the identification of bird species in decline, as well as those expanding territories.

We need volunteers on December 31st for the South Marin area CBC. Some birding experience is preferred, and if you are an experienced birder we are in need of a couple of count area leaders.  Volunteers will be assigned to help out a count area team. In addition to being part of this important tradition, it is a great opportunity to get outside to see some interesting birds and beautiful locales.

If you are interested in participating in the South Marin CBC please contact Ed Nute at smcbc.marinaudubon@gmail.com

Welcome to the Marin Audubon Society

About Us

The Marin Audubon Society was established in 1956 as part of the effort to prevent development of houses on Richardson Bay tidelands. Our Mission is “To conserve and restore natural ecosystems, focusing on birds, other wildlife, and their habitats, for the benefit of humanity and the Earth’s biological diversity.” More »

For more than 60 years Marin Audubon has worked to protect wildlife habitat in Marin, sometimes stepping in to buy land that is slated for development.

MAS also provides its members and the public many opportunities to experience the birdlife and nature of Marin County and beyond through Field Trips and Events, our monthly MAS newsletter The Rail, and three annual Marin Christmas Bird Counts.

ALERT: Report Barred Owl Sightings

Barred Owls have extended their range to the west coast, from the east coast, and have been seen in Marin. There is increasing concern about their impact on Marin's Northern Spotted Owl population. Barred Owls are larger, more agencies have begun to monitor Barred Owl...

San Francisco Bay Joint Venture honors Barbara Salzman

If you have ever participated in any stage of wetland restoration work in Marin County, you have surely met the one and only Barbara Salzman!  Barbara has been working in the field of conservation and advocating on behalf of wetlands and habitats threatened by...

Membership

We invite you to become a Chapter Supporting Member of Marin Audubon to support our important habitat protection and restoration work, conservation advocacy, our full calendar of birding field trips and speakers and our newsletter, The Rail. More »

ALERT: Report Barred Owl Sightings

Barred Owls have extended their range to the west coast, from the east coast, and have been seen in Marin. There is increasing concern about their impact on Marin's Northern Spotted Owl population. Barred Owls are larger, more agencies have begun to monitor Barred Owl activity in Marin and they need your help! Notify the appropriate agency asap should you see what might be a Barred Owl: For sightings on federal land, notify Bill Merkle - National Parks Service Wildlife Biologist;...

read more

Field Trips

Dec 10

Corte Madera Ecological Reserve – December #2

DECEMBER 10 @ 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Saturday, December 10, 2022
9:00 AM to noon
Birding with Bryan Flaig
Register HERE for this field trip

Registration opens on Thursday, November 30 at 8 AM. Trip limit is 20 participants. No drop ins, please. 

This trip is perfect for beginning birders looking to learn how to identify waterfowl and shorebirds, as well as experienced birders interested in honing their skills. Corte Madera Ecological Reserve contains a variety of birding habitats, like tidal ponds, pickleweed marshes and a high tide refuge purchased by Marin Audubon in 2016. Much of the area has undergone extensive restoration for rare and endangered salt marsh species.

On this field trip, we will hike a short distance to explore the marsh at high tide, searching for elusive Ridgway’s Rails and winter residents. We’ll walk along the east side of Shorebird Marsh (pond), observing the wide variety of ducks, gulls, and wading shorebirds that frequent the area this time of year.

Restrooms are available at nearby stores (Trader Joe’s), but not on the marsh. Bring binoculars, scopes, layers, water, and snacks. Plan for a 1.5 to 2 mile walk on flat terrain. Light rain does not cancel the trip.

DIRECTIONS: Corte Madera Ecological Reserve is located behind Trader Joe’s in Corte Madera. Meet in the parking lot behind the store, accessed by the driveway on the south side of World Market. 

Become a chapter supporting member of the Marin Audubon Society starting at $35 a year, or RENEW your membership today! Your membership helps to fund important efforts such as our ongoing habitat restoration projects, the Monarch Rescue Project, and our Northern Spotted Owl Outreach program. We cannot do these important projects, along with our many other efforts, without the support of our dedicated members!

Jan 05

The Ponds at Las Gallinas Sanitary District (LGVSD)

JANUARY 5, 2023 @ 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Thursday, January 5, 2022
8:30 to 11:30 AM
Birding with Sande and Bob Chilvers 

All participants are welcome to join this trip. No registration required. 

Join old friends and meet new ones on our regularly scheduled walks on the first Thursday of the month at Las Gallinas. With fall migration just about over, we might see more waterfowl and spot interesting species, so come assist in our search.
We welcome bird enthusiasts of all levels. We all help each other to find and identify the birds, and there are usually several experienced birders to assist. 

DIRECTIONS: From Hwy 101, exit at Smith Ranch Rd. Drive east on Smith Ranch Rd toward McInnis Park. Turn left immediately after crossing the railroad tracks and drive about 0.5 mile through the LGVSD gates and into the parking lot at the end of the road. Meet the group by the bridge just past the parking lot. There is an outhouse in the parking area for public use. 

Jan 07

STINSON / BOLINAS

JANUARY 7, 2023 @ 8:30 AM - 3:00 PM

Birding in Marin Season 8-Trip 1
Saturday, January 7, 2023
8:30 AM to mid afternoon
Birding with Jim White and Bob Battagin
Register HERE for this field trip

Registration opens on December 28, 2022 at 8 AM. Trip limit is 15 participants. No drop-ins, please.

A healthy happy New Year to you all. Bob and I are pleased to share the bird rich Stinson Beach / Bolinas birding area with you. Coupled with non freezing winter weather and many diverse habitats the CBC, Southern Marin Christmas Bird Counts, show this to be most specie rich, birdiest, area in Southern Marin county. These habitats include the ocean, beaches, rocky shores, a large lagoon with acres of mudflats, Douglas Fir and Redwood forests, Alder riparian, parking lots, residential and more. The CBC data show an average of over 125 specie winter in this area. Plus, many of these birds, like ducks, gulls and shorebirds, are rather easy to see as they float about on the water or walk along the open shores. Can we find 100 species today?

Thanks can be given today to the founders of Marin Audubon and some conservation minded elders for the parks, open space, public access, and wildlife habitats in much of the country and around Bolinas Lagoon. Dr Martin Griffith was instrumental in saving Bolinas harbor from a hotel and yacht club destination and he is commemorated at the heron and egret rookery that we will pass along the east side of the lagoon.

So start your year list if you haven’t already. Bob is adept with ebird but he is recovering from hip replacement surgery. We strive to help all of our participants to see or hear all of the birds that we encounter but that is a goal not quite a reality. Let’s go birding!

Meet at 8:30 at the Stinson/Bolinas School on Highway 1

Become a chapter supporting member of the Marin Audubon Society starting at $35 a year, or RENEW your membership today! Your membership helps to fund important efforts such as our ongoing habitat restoration projects, the Monarch Rescue Project, and our Northern Spotted Owl Outreach program. We cannot do these important projects, along with our many other efforts, without the support of our dedicated members!

Jan 24

Hamilton Wetlands

JANUARY 24, 2023 @ 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Tuesday, January 24, 2023
10 AM to 2 PM
Birding with Daniel Edelstein
Register HERE for this field trip

Registration opens January 14 at 8 AM.. Trip limit is 15 participants. No drop-ins, please.

We’ll pursue sightings of visiting shorebird, duck, gull, and songbird species for this area, including uncommon to rare species such as Lesser Yellowlegs, Western Snowy Plover, Glaucous Gull, Lesser Scaup, Barrow’s Goldeneye, Eurasian/Common Green-winged Teal, and Redhead.

Feel free to pack a lunch and beverage. Spotting scope recommended, but not essential.

Daniel is a long-time Avian Biologist, Birding Guide, and college birding instructor (WarblerWatch.com).

Directions: From US-101N, take exit 458, take right fork to continue on Nave Dr. Make a right on Main Gate Road, continue onto Palm Drive, right onto Hangar Ave, continue to South Hamilton Park, near the end of the road. Parking is available in the Park’s parking lot. Meet at the Hamilton Wetlands trailhead, near the South Hamilton Park playground.

Feb 05

Winter Birds of the Delta – Boat Trip

FEBRUARY 5, 2023 @ 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Birding with David Wimpfheimer
Sunday, February 5th, 2023
Boat departs at 9 AM. Plan to arrive early!
Register HERE for this field trip. Please see below for important registration information.

The trip costs $135. Limited to 25 people. Registration for this trip opens January 9 at 8AM. Tickets may be cancelled until February 2 at 12 noonCancellations will be refunded MINUS the TicketBud service charges.

If tickets aren’t available, you may sign up for the waitlist by clicking the “Contact Organizer” prompt on Ticketbud and leaving your name and phone number. 

This very popular trip is being held the first weekend in Feb on Sunday Feb 5. We’ll depart from the Antioch Marina at 9AM and enter the San Joaquin River, keeping an eye out for overwintering birds and any marine (or other) animals that happen to show up. As we head east, we enter a number of the smaller sloughs and waterways with views out over the flooded agricultural fields that provide a refuge for flocks that nest in the north but winter here.

Along with the flocks of snow geese, white fronted geese and Tundra swans, numerous ducks, shorebirds, and raptors are usually spotted. Well known birder and naturalist David Wimpfheimer will provide commentary and Ronn Patterson (captain and naturalist) will fill in bits about the history of the delta as we transit this altered but still viable ecosystem.

Coffee, tea, hot chocolate is provided, bring lunch and snacks. Bad weather can cancel as with any winter trip. Light rain will not cancel.

Ticket holders will receive directions to the Antioch Marina, where the trip begins and ends, and other instructions, approximately one week prior to the trip. 

Inclement weather will reschedule the trip to Sunday, February 19.

Speaker Series

Dec 08

Domestic Cat Management: Challenges and Opportunities

DECEMBER 8 @ 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Thursday, December 8, 2022
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Speaker: Grant Sizemore
Register HERE for this Speaker Series

Domestic cats (Felis catus) can make wonderful pets, but their unrestrained presence on the landscape presents serious challenges. Outdoor cats are introduced predators that inflict serious harm to birds and other wildlife and contribute to a variety of public health risks. Cat management, however, has historically been complicated by unclear authorities, resource limitations, competing priorities, and a tradition of laissez-faire attitudes. This talk will review the wildlife conservation and public health evidence emphasizing the need for owned and unowned cat management and present solutions for cat owners and communities to effect meaningful change that will benefit cats, wildlife, and people.

Grant Sizemore earned B.S. degrees in Zoology and Environmental Science from Miami University in Ohio and an M.S. in Wildlife Ecology and Conservation from the University of Florida. He has experience in wildlife conservation research, education, and policy and is currently the Director of Invasive Species Programs at American Bird Conservancy, where he has run the Cats Indoors program for the last 10 years.

Photo Credit –  Shutterstock_forestpath
Caption – “Domestic Cat and Hooded Warbler”

Jan 11

Nature’s Best Hope

JANUARY 11, 2023 @ 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Presentor: Doug Tallamy
Wednesday January 11, 2023
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Register HERE for this Speaker Series – Passcode: 844579

Recent headlines about global insect declines and three billion fewer birds in North America are a bleak reality check about how ineffective our current landscape designs have been at sustaining the plants and animals that sustain us. To create landscapes that enhance local ecosystems rather than degrade them, we must 1 remove the invasives on our property and 2) add the native plant communities that sustain food webs, sequester carbon, maintain diverse native bee communities, and manage our watersheds. If we do this in half of the area now in lawn, we can create Homegrown National Park, a 20 million acre network of viable habitats that will provide vital corridors connecting the few natural areas that remain. This approach to conservation empowers everyone to play a significant role in the future of the natural world. 

Doug Tallamy is the T. A. Baker Professor of Agriculture in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware, where he has authored 106 research publications and has taught insect related courses for 41 years. Chief among his research goals is to better understand the many ways insects interact with plants and how such interactions determine the diversity of animal communities. His books include Bringing Nature Home, The Living Landscape, co-authored with Rick Darke, Nature’s Best Hope, a New York Times Best Seller, The Nature of Oaks, winner of the American Horticultural Society’s 2022 book award. In 2021 he co-founded Homegrown National Park with Michelle Alfandari. His awards include recognition from The Garden Writers Association, Audubon, The National Wildlife Federation, Allegheny College, The Garden Club of America and The American Horticultural Association. 

Tonight’s program is a Zoom presentation of Golden Gate Audubon Society, co-sponsored by Marin Audubon Society and other Bay Area Audubon chapters. The direct link to the program is below. No registration is required.

Speaker Series

Marin Audubon hosts a monthly Speaker Series on the second Thursday of the month, from September through June. The programs feature lectures on birds, mammals, and other natural history topics and are given by speakers who are experts in their field. Programs are free and open to the public. More »

Conservation

Maybe you have had the experience of passing a favorite spot only to be disappointed at the sight of bulldozers and “progress” at work. Maybe you’ve lamented about the inevitability of it all, enraged that it occurred, or maybe you are frustrated about loss of wildlife, trees, habitats and/or climate change. If you have, then it is time to think about Marin Audubon’s Conservation Committee. More »

Volunteer

MAS offers many opportunities to meet fellow members and to support our environmental protection and conservation efforts. Would you like to serve on the Board of Directors? Help with the Christmas Bird Count? Help with restoration projects? Join the MAS Conservation Committee? Help with the annual MAS/ACR Mother’s Day BBQ event in May? These are just a few of the many ways that you can pursue your interests or share your talents. More »

Properties

Consistent with our mission “To conserve and restore natural ecosystems, focusing on birds, other wildlife, and their habitats, for the benefit of humanity and the earth’s biological diversity” the Marin Audubon Society has been acquiring properties in Marin County with current or restorable habitats. Some properties are restored and turned over to a public agency and some properties remain in the ownership of the Marin Audubon Society. More »

Stewardship/Restoration

Marin Audubon plans and implements habitat restoration and enhancement projects, maintains habitats, and monitors activities on properties it owns. Restorations focus on recreating tidal marshes and associated transition zone and upland habitats. Restorations usually involve moving dirt fill or levees to lower elevations or remove obstructions(levees) to tidal waters and are usually undertaken with grants from federal, state or private foundations. More »

Photo Credits

Photographs throughout this website were contributed by Len Blumin, Elyse Omernick, Dave Strauss, Jude Stalker, Gerry Jarocki, Ann Thomas, Ed Nute, Richard Bohnet, and Barbara Salzman.

MAS BOARD OPPORTUNITY

Marin Audubon has extensive programs, has made impressive accomplishments preserving and restoring habitats, and conducts volunteer work days to maintain habitats we own. Our programs include conservation to protect our environment, the Breeding Bird Atlas, field trips to see and learn about birds, and monthly illustrated talks about birds and natural history.

At this critical time when climate change threatens birds, habitats and ourselves, a strong and involved  board of directors is even more important to help us deal with these issues locally. We depend on volunteers, including members of our Board, to plan and oversee our programs. To find out more about our Board, and other volunteer opportunities, and how you can help, please contact a member of our Nominating Committee:  

Douglas Waterman:
Lelia Lanctot:
Martha Jarocki:

Speaker Series

Dec 08

Domestic Cat Management: Challenges and Opportunities

DECEMBER 8 @ 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Thursday, December 8, 2022
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Speaker: Grant Sizemore
Register HERE for this Speaker Series

Domestic cats (Felis catus) can make wonderful pets, but their unrestrained presence on the landscape presents serious challenges. Outdoor cats are introduced predators that inflict serious harm to birds and other wildlife and contribute to a variety of public health risks. Cat management, however, has historically been complicated by unclear authorities, resource limitations, competing priorities, and a tradition of laissez-faire attitudes. This talk will review the wildlife conservation and public health evidence emphasizing the need for owned and unowned cat management and present solutions for cat owners and communities to effect meaningful change that will benefit cats, wildlife, and people.

Grant Sizemore earned B.S. degrees in Zoology and Environmental Science from Miami University in Ohio and an M.S. in Wildlife Ecology and Conservation from the University of Florida. He has experience in wildlife conservation research, education, and policy and is currently the Director of Invasive Species Programs at American Bird Conservancy, where he has run the Cats Indoors program for the last 10 years.

Photo Credit –  Shutterstock_forestpath
Caption – “Domestic Cat and Hooded Warbler”

Jan 11

Nature’s Best Hope

JANUARY 11, 2023 @ 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Presentor: Doug Tallamy
Wednesday January 11, 2023
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Register HERE for this Speaker Series – Passcode: 844579

Recent headlines about global insect declines and three billion fewer birds in North America are a bleak reality check about how ineffective our current landscape designs have been at sustaining the plants and animals that sustain us. To create landscapes that enhance local ecosystems rather than degrade them, we must 1 remove the invasives on our property and 2) add the native plant communities that sustain food webs, sequester carbon, maintain diverse native bee communities, and manage our watersheds. If we do this in half of the area now in lawn, we can create Homegrown National Park, a 20 million acre network of viable habitats that will provide vital corridors connecting the few natural areas that remain. This approach to conservation empowers everyone to play a significant role in the future of the natural world. 

Doug Tallamy is the T. A. Baker Professor of Agriculture in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware, where he has authored 106 research publications and has taught insect related courses for 41 years. Chief among his research goals is to better understand the many ways insects interact with plants and how such interactions determine the diversity of animal communities. His books include Bringing Nature Home, The Living Landscape, co-authored with Rick Darke, Nature’s Best Hope, a New York Times Best Seller, The Nature of Oaks, winner of the American Horticultural Society’s 2022 book award. In 2021 he co-founded Homegrown National Park with Michelle Alfandari. His awards include recognition from The Garden Writers Association, Audubon, The National Wildlife Federation, Allegheny College, The Garden Club of America and The American Horticultural Association. 

Tonight’s program is a Zoom presentation of Golden Gate Audubon Society, co-sponsored by Marin Audubon Society and other Bay Area Audubon chapters. The direct link to the program is below. No registration is required.

Field Trips

Dec 10

Corte Madera Ecological Reserve – December #2

DECEMBER 10 @ 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Saturday, December 10, 2022
9:00 AM to noon
Birding with Bryan Flaig
Register HERE for this field trip

Registration opens on Thursday, November 30 at 8 AM. Trip limit is 20 participants. No drop ins, please. 

This trip is perfect for beginning birders looking to learn how to identify waterfowl and shorebirds, as well as experienced birders interested in honing their skills. Corte Madera Ecological Reserve contains a variety of birding habitats, like tidal ponds, pickleweed marshes and a high tide refuge purchased by Marin Audubon in 2016. Much of the area has undergone extensive restoration for rare and endangered salt marsh species.

On this field trip, we will hike a short distance to explore the marsh at high tide, searching for elusive Ridgway’s Rails and winter residents. We’ll walk along the east side of Shorebird Marsh (pond), observing the wide variety of ducks, gulls, and wading shorebirds that frequent the area this time of year.

Restrooms are available at nearby stores (Trader Joe’s), but not on the marsh. Bring binoculars, scopes, layers, water, and snacks. Plan for a 1.5 to 2 mile walk on flat terrain. Light rain does not cancel the trip.

DIRECTIONS: Corte Madera Ecological Reserve is located behind Trader Joe’s in Corte Madera. Meet in the parking lot behind the store, accessed by the driveway on the south side of World Market. 

Become a chapter supporting member of the Marin Audubon Society starting at $35 a year, or RENEW your membership today! Your membership helps to fund important efforts such as our ongoing habitat restoration projects, the Monarch Rescue Project, and our Northern Spotted Owl Outreach program. We cannot do these important projects, along with our many other efforts, without the support of our dedicated members!

Jan 05

The Ponds at Las Gallinas Sanitary District (LGVSD)

JANUARY 5, 2023 @ 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Thursday, January 5, 2022
8:30 to 11:30 AM
Birding with Sande and Bob Chilvers 

All participants are welcome to join this trip. No registration required. 

Join old friends and meet new ones on our regularly scheduled walks on the first Thursday of the month at Las Gallinas. With fall migration just about over, we might see more waterfowl and spot interesting species, so come assist in our search.
We welcome bird enthusiasts of all levels. We all help each other to find and identify the birds, and there are usually several experienced birders to assist. 

DIRECTIONS: From Hwy 101, exit at Smith Ranch Rd. Drive east on Smith Ranch Rd toward McInnis Park. Turn left immediately after crossing the railroad tracks and drive about 0.5 mile through the LGVSD gates and into the parking lot at the end of the road. Meet the group by the bridge just past the parking lot. There is an outhouse in the parking area for public use. 

Jan 07

STINSON / BOLINAS

JANUARY 7, 2023 @ 8:30 AM - 3:00 PM

Birding in Marin Season 8-Trip 1
Saturday, January 7, 2023
8:30 AM to mid afternoon
Birding with Jim White and Bob Battagin
Register HERE for this field trip

Registration opens on December 28, 2022 at 8 AM. Trip limit is 15 participants. No drop-ins, please.

A healthy happy New Year to you all. Bob and I are pleased to share the bird rich Stinson Beach / Bolinas birding area with you. Coupled with non freezing winter weather and many diverse habitats the CBC, Southern Marin Christmas Bird Counts, show this to be most specie rich, birdiest, area in Southern Marin county. These habitats include the ocean, beaches, rocky shores, a large lagoon with acres of mudflats, Douglas Fir and Redwood forests, Alder riparian, parking lots, residential and more. The CBC data show an average of over 125 specie winter in this area. Plus, many of these birds, like ducks, gulls and shorebirds, are rather easy to see as they float about on the water or walk along the open shores. Can we find 100 species today?

Thanks can be given today to the founders of Marin Audubon and some conservation minded elders for the parks, open space, public access, and wildlife habitats in much of the country and around Bolinas Lagoon. Dr Martin Griffith was instrumental in saving Bolinas harbor from a hotel and yacht club destination and he is commemorated at the heron and egret rookery that we will pass along the east side of the lagoon.

So start your year list if you haven’t already. Bob is adept with ebird but he is recovering from hip replacement surgery. We strive to help all of our participants to see or hear all of the birds that we encounter but that is a goal not quite a reality. Let’s go birding!

Meet at 8:30 at the Stinson/Bolinas School on Highway 1

Become a chapter supporting member of the Marin Audubon Society starting at $35 a year, or RENEW your membership today! Your membership helps to fund important efforts such as our ongoing habitat restoration projects, the Monarch Rescue Project, and our Northern Spotted Owl Outreach program. We cannot do these important projects, along with our many other efforts, without the support of our dedicated members!

Jan 24

Hamilton Wetlands

JANUARY 24, 2023 @ 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Tuesday, January 24, 2023
10 AM to 2 PM
Birding with Daniel Edelstein
Register HERE for this field trip

Registration opens January 14 at 8 AM.. Trip limit is 15 participants. No drop-ins, please.

We’ll pursue sightings of visiting shorebird, duck, gull, and songbird species for this area, including uncommon to rare species such as Lesser Yellowlegs, Western Snowy Plover, Glaucous Gull, Lesser Scaup, Barrow’s Goldeneye, Eurasian/Common Green-winged Teal, and Redhead.

Feel free to pack a lunch and beverage. Spotting scope recommended, but not essential.

Daniel is a long-time Avian Biologist, Birding Guide, and college birding instructor (WarblerWatch.com).

Directions: From US-101N, take exit 458, take right fork to continue on Nave Dr. Make a right on Main Gate Road, continue onto Palm Drive, right onto Hangar Ave, continue to South Hamilton Park, near the end of the road. Parking is available in the Park’s parking lot. Meet at the Hamilton Wetlands trailhead, near the South Hamilton Park playground.

Feb 05

Winter Birds of the Delta – Boat Trip

FEBRUARY 5, 2023 @ 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Birding with David Wimpfheimer
Sunday, February 5th, 2023
Boat departs at 9 AM. Plan to arrive early!
Register HERE for this field trip. Please see below for important registration information.

The trip costs $135. Limited to 25 people. Registration for this trip opens January 9 at 8AM. Tickets may be cancelled until February 2 at 12 noonCancellations will be refunded MINUS the TicketBud service charges.

If tickets aren’t available, you may sign up for the waitlist by clicking the “Contact Organizer” prompt on Ticketbud and leaving your name and phone number. 

This very popular trip is being held the first weekend in Feb on Sunday Feb 5. We’ll depart from the Antioch Marina at 9AM and enter the San Joaquin River, keeping an eye out for overwintering birds and any marine (or other) animals that happen to show up. As we head east, we enter a number of the smaller sloughs and waterways with views out over the flooded agricultural fields that provide a refuge for flocks that nest in the north but winter here.

Along with the flocks of snow geese, white fronted geese and Tundra swans, numerous ducks, shorebirds, and raptors are usually spotted. Well known birder and naturalist David Wimpfheimer will provide commentary and Ronn Patterson (captain and naturalist) will fill in bits about the history of the delta as we transit this altered but still viable ecosystem.

Coffee, tea, hot chocolate is provided, bring lunch and snacks. Bad weather can cancel as with any winter trip. Light rain will not cancel.

Ticket holders will receive directions to the Antioch Marina, where the trip begins and ends, and other instructions, approximately one week prior to the trip. 

Inclement weather will reschedule the trip to Sunday, February 19.

Become a Marin Audubon Society Member Today!

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ALERT: Report Barred Owl Sightings

Barred Owls have extended their range to the west coast, from the east coast, and have been seen in Marin. There is increasing concern about their impact on Marin's Northern Spotted Owl population. Barred Owls are larger, more agencies have begun to monitor Barred Owl activity in Marin and they need your help! Notify the appropriate agency asap should you see what might be a Barred Owl: For sightings on federal land, notify Bill Merkle - National Parks Service Wildlife Biologist;...

read more

Shop AmazonSmile to Benefit Marin Audubon

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